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Read all about the new features and changes at PRexamples.com

Right. There are going to be a few changes around here.

Firstly, from the beginning of April, we’ll be introducing PR Example of the Week. Secondly, and perhaps obviously, we’ll also be introducing PR Example of the Month.

This will be entirely based on the best-read posts in any given week or month. There really isn’t much more to it than that.

The reason for starting them from the beginning of April is two-fold. One: it just seems right that we should start from the beginning of a brand new month and two: a badge I was trying to fudge together for winners – stretching my MS Paint skills further than they’ve ever been stretched – was nonchalantly laughed at by my fiancée, with the sort of concern for another person’s feelings one might expect from Ted Bundy, or Charles Arthur. Starting a week later means I may have stopped crying for long enough to have another go.

The other change is that PRexamples.com is going to start running a competition.

‘Ooooooooo’, I hear you say, in the mock-impressed tone usually assumed by game show audiences when a weekend ‘holiday’ to Butlins Bognor Regis is proposed as a prize. Well, to be honest, it’s not even that good – at least not yet, as I have no prizes to put up.

But you might like it, nonetheless.

Every fortnight (or every month – I’m undecided), site fans will be offered an entirely fictitious PR scenario.

For example, I might suggest that everybody’s favourite cartoon conglomerate Acme has been taking heat for the negative way the brand is depicted in Roadrunner. The products always look impressive, but nevertheless, appear never to work – or at least, Wile E. Coyote’s misuse of them makes the en

tire range look like cheap tat. I might ask how you, as the company’s public relations manager, would address this issue.

What sort of campaign would you devise? Would a (cunning… tee hee) stunt work best, would you run a slur campaign against Wile E., highlighting his obvious inability to succeed or would another tactic work best?

You would have a set amount of time (perhaps a week) in which to write a comment on the post, within a pre-stated number of words and I would approve all comments at the same time to ensure ideas have the same chance of being voted for.

The comment with the most votes from site readers wins.

I’ve been thinking of a way to have a bit of fun with the site beyond the obvious day-to-day examples the site’s wonderful contributors find for you, and think this could be one such way. The competition would be open to all, from students through to Matthew Freud and everybody in-between (if a commenter calls into question Wile E. Coyote’s sexual past as a response to the above scenario, you can be sure it’s Mr Clifford).

So, that’s it, I just wanted to give you all a bit of notice as to the new features. If anybody’s reading this and can think of potential prizes for the as-yet-unnamed competitions, please do get in touch, either by email (rich@PRexamples.com) or on Twitter @PRexamples.

Happy PRing!

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Rich started PRexamples.com in January 2012. It has been named Vuelio's top PR blog. He runs consumer PR agency Radioactive PR, which has two offices in the UK. He also wrote 'Myths of PR', which went on to become Amazon's best-selling PR book within days of release. In March 2013, Rich co-founded blogger outreach service bloggabase.com. He tweets about PR stunts, campaigns and other media bits and pieces @RichLeighPR

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