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Top 10 PR and marketing stunts and campaigns of October 2017

I mentioned in this recent top 10 post that I was either selling or retiring PRexamples.com. To give you a quick update, I was inundated with interest, and am weighing it all up. It looks likely it’ll be under new ownership, but hey, you never know with these things! If you’d like to throw your name in the hat at this later stage, feel free to get in touch (details at the bottom of this...

First 500 ‘scary clowns’ can get free Whoppers at Burger King tonight

Burger King in the US has announced that it will give free Whopper burgers to the first 500 people dressed as clowns from 7 pm until close tonight (Hallowe’en night, future reader) at 5 participating locations in Miami, Boston, Los Angeles, Austin and Salt Lake City. With nearly half a million views, this #ScaryClownNight campaign video, riding stylistically on the back of IT and Stranger Things, says...

‘Up yours, I quit’ vandalised car WAS a PR stunt, and here’s who was behind it

There’s a slim chance you missed it last week, but in probability given the make-up of this site’s readers, you will have spotted the story of the ‘up yours, I quit’ vandalised car in Leeds. It was covered widely by the UK nationals, and picked up steam across social media. It was clear to the trained eye that it was a PR stunt of sorts – and now we know the answer. The idea,...

Pop-up customers asked to pay with personal data instead of cash

This thought-provoking stunt is a few weeks old, but well worth a mention. To emphaphise just how much data we provide freely to the platforms we use to share our lives, cyber-security firm Kaspersky Lab opened a pop-up shop inside Old Street station in London called The Data Dollar Store. Customers were able to buy exclusive t-shirts, mugs and screen prints by street artist Ben Eine – not with money,...

New Marmite site analyses your face to determine whether you’re a lover or a hater

Last week, a story alleging that your love or hatred for Marmite is genetic did the rounds, and picked up a decent spread (sorry) of coverage as a result. Apparently, it was part of the brand’s new campaign, the Marmite Gene Project. This week, the marketing released a micro-site dedicated to, again, using spurious purely-for-PR science to determine whether you’re a lover or a hater. You can’t...

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